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2015 50c War in the Pacific UNC

You are here: The Royal Australian Mint 2015 50c War in the Pacific UNC

 
 
Price: $10.00 Product Code: 12675
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Description:

An official Australian legal tender tribute to the War in the Pacific, and a fundamentally important coin for those interested in Australia's role in the World War II, this official release from the Royal Australian Mint is a compulsory acquisition for collectors. Why? Because, not issued for circulation, and therefore never found in change, this affordable coin is the only way you can keep your collection complete!


Ready to slot into the RAM’s official Australia at War Collection album, available here, the unique, one-year-only 2015 War in the Pacific 50c is...
 

  • an official Australian legal tender issue – measures 31.51mm
  • struck to the Royal Australian Mint’s rigorous Unc quality
  • a strictly limited edition – mintage restricted to 50,000
  • presented within an attractive, official RAM pack
  • within the reach of all at the RAM’s Official Issue Price



The War in the Pacific
Unlike World War I, World War II brought with it the prospect of military conflict on Australia’s doorstep. When the Japanese launched its Pacific offensive on 7 & 8 December 1941, attacking Malaya, Thailand and Pearl Harbour in the USA, that prospect became reality. Japan achieved victory after victory in the early months of the Pacific War, and with the enemy moving ever closer to Australia’s shores, Australians felt a very real fear of invasion throughout 1942 – a fear intensified by the bombing of Darwin, the midget submarine attacks on Sydney Harbour, and the bombardment of Sydney and Newcastle.

Fought between the Imperial Japanese Navy and the forces of both Australia and the USA in early May, 1942, the Battle of the Coral Sea proved the turning point in the War in the Pacific. Following a series of lightning victories in the march south, the Battle of the Coral Sea represented the first time that Japanese expansionism had been checked, and their plan to invade Port Moresby had to be postponed. Australian forces also played an important role along the Kokoda Track, and at Milne Bay, blunting the Japanese offensive, and were engaged with Japan in Borneo in the final period of the war.

A few days after the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima had been devastated by atomic bombs, Japan accepted the terms of the Potsdam Declaration, and surrendered on 15 August 1945. The final instrument of surrender was signed upon USS Missouri on 2 September, signifying the official conclusion of one of the bloodiest conflicts in history.



Ready to slot into the RAM’s official Australia at War Collection album, available here, the unique, one-year-only 2015 War in the Pacific 50c is...
 

  • an official Australian legal tender issue – measures 31.51mm
  • struck to the Royal Australian Mint’s rigorous Unc quality
  • a strictly limited edition – mintage restricted to 50,000
  • presented within an attractive, official RAM pack
  • within the reach of all at the RAM’s Official Issue Price



The War in the Pacific
Unlike World War I, World War II brought with it the prospect of military conflict on Australia’s doorstep. When the Japanese launched its Pacific offensive on 7 & 8 December 1941, attacking Malaya, Thailand and Pearl Harbour in the USA, that prospect became reality. Japan achieved victory after victory in the early months of the Pacific War, and with the enemy moving ever closer to Australia’s shores, Australians felt a very real fear of invasion throughout 1942 – a fear intensified by the bombing of Darwin, the midget submarine attacks on Sydney Harbour, and the bombardment of Sydney and Newcastle.

Fought between the Imperial Japanese Navy and the forces of both Australia and the USA in early May, 1942, the Battle of the Coral Sea proved the turning point in the War in the Pacific. Following a series of lightning victories in the march south, the Battle of the Coral Sea represented the first time that Japanese expansionism had been checked, and their plan to invade Port Moresby had to be postponed. Australian forces also played an important role along the Kokoda Track, and at Milne Bay, blunting the Japanese offensive, and were engaged with Japan in Borneo in the final period of the war.

A few days after the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima had been devastated by atomic bombs, Japan accepted the terms of the Potsdam Declaration, and surrendered on 15 August 1945. The final instrument of surrender was signed upon USS Missouri on 2 September, signifying the official conclusion of one of the bloodiest conflicts in history.

Product ID: 12675
$ 10

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